How to Maximize the Speed of Your Internet Connection

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Compare your results against what you’re paying for. Check with your service provider to see what speeds you “should” be getting. Keep in mind that speeds advertised by your provider are “best case” speeds, and you may not be able to actually get that number on a regular basis.

Reset your network. Restarting your modem and router will help to solve a lot of network connectivity issues. If your modem or router don’t have power switches, you can unplug the power cable, wait 30 seconds, and then plug it back in. See this guide for details on resetting your network.

Check that signals aren’t conflicting. If you are using a Wireless router, make sure it doesn’t conflict with a cordless phone or wireless camera. Wireless routers come in multiple varieties; 802.11 b, g, and n (2.4 GHz) or 802.11 a (5.8 GHz). If you are using a 2.4 GHz Cordless phone and a 2.4 GHz wireless router, your network connection will be slow when the phone is in use. The same is true of wireless security cameras. Check the frequency on your phone and camera; if it’s 900 MHz then it’s fine. If it says 2.4 GHz or 5.8 GHz then it could be the cause of your slow connection speed while they’re in use.

Check to see if you’ve reached your ISP’s data cap. Many internet service providers place a data cap on their customers that may be a little hard to find. Log in to your account page, or contact the customer service department to see if you have gone over your monthly allowance. Often, the penalty for going over the cap is decreased speed for the rest of the billing period.

Call your ISP Support. Sometimes you just have bad service that can only be fixed on your provider’s end. They can usually tell if your connection is substandard without having a technician come to your home. You may be asked to reset your network again.

Check all of the devices on your network. If someone else on your network is downloading a lot of media from the internet, such as watching video or downloading large files, it is probably hogging a large percentage of your bandwidth.

Relocate your wireless router or computer. If you are connected to the internet via a Wi-Fi router, poor signal can lead to lower speeds and dropped connections. Move your router closer to your computer if possible, or move the computer so that it is closer to the router or keep the router on top of a cupboard to transmit better signal.

Check your filters if you have DSL. When you activated DSL, you hooked the line from your phone jack into one side of a rectangular box filter. On the other side, you have 2 lines coming out, 1 for your phone and 1 for your modem. If you are using a DSL connection over your land-line, make sure that you have high-quality filters in place to get optimum signal speed.

Check the weather. If you are using satellite internet, your internet connection might be altered because of wind, heavy snow, rain, lightning, static, or other electrical interference.

 

How to Fix Common Internet Problems

Manage your browser’s cache. Make sure you know how to clear your browser cache, which includes your cookies, temporary internet files, browsing and download history, form data, and so on. You can also do an intensive clean by deleting your usage history tracks on Windows. To deal more specifically with cookies, read up on how to:

  • View cookies
  • Enable cookies
  • Disable cookies
  • Clear cookies

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Clear your Google search history. Though Google Search History is designed to customize search results to fit your needs, many people aren’t comfortable with being tracked by such a huge and powerful organization.

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Stop ads and spam. One of the easiest ways to do this is to use an ad-blocking program. Try Adblock Plus on Firefox or Adblock on Google Chrome. (You can also go through a special procedure to specifically block ads in Hotmail.) Make sure you also know how to prevent and block spam.

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Avoid bugs. Make sure you know how to avoid getting a virus or worm on Windows and get rid of adware, spyware, and viruses once you do have them.

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Restrict certain sites. Make sure you know how to filter porn from your computer. You can also restrict web browsing on Internet Explorer

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Speed up your connection. Use tips in next post to maximize your connection speed (or speed up your wireless Comcast connection, if applicable). You might also want to test whether or not your internet service provider is limiting your bandwidth.
 

Find your computer’s address. You can look up either your IP address or your MAC address (which is built into your hardware).

 

Secure your wireless network. If your network has no password (or even a lousy one), it’s be vulnerable to being used by nearby computers and devices. If you bank, shop, or transmit any other sensitive information online, you run the risk of allowing it to be seen by strangers.

 

Simple Hack Gives Windows XP Users 5 More Years Of Support

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Forget Wolverine, clearly there is nothing more difficult to kill than Windows XP . Having finally ditched support for the 12 year old operating system in April, Microsoft MSFT -0.24% performed an arguably foolish U-turn just three weeks later when a massive Internet Explorer flaw blew holes through every version of Windows. And now it seems users will be able to get five more years of Windows XP support .
No Microsoft hasn’t changed its mind yet again. Instead the life extension comes courtesy of a simple hack spotted by computer tech support. The workaround exploits Microsoft’s continued support of ‘Windows Embedded Industry’ (previously ‘Windows Embedded POSReady’) which will last until 2019. Embedded Industry is designed for use in industry devices across retail, manufacturing, healthcare and – you guessed it – the operating system is based on Windows XP Service Pack 3.

Consequently the security updates that continue to be released for Windows Embedded Industry are essentially the same as what Microsoft would have released for Windows XP, had support continued. Now with a simple hack you can trick Windows Update into thinking Windows XP is Windows Embedded Industry.

This is how you do it:

1. Create a text document, and call it XP.reg. Be sure that the ending is ‘.reg’ not ‘XP.reg.txt.’ (check this in Windows Explorer by going to Tools > Folder Options > View and check ‘Show hidden files and folders’)

2. Right click the file, select ‘Edit’ and type in:

3. Save it and double click the file twice with the left mouse button which will add it to the registry.

You’re done. Windows XP will now tell Microsoft Update it is Windows Embedded Industry and automatically download and install security updates as they are released. The snag is this hack only works for Windows XP 32bit because Windows XP 64bit is based on Windows Server 2003. There is a more complex workaround for that which can be found here.

Now come the caveats. Firstly the updates are designed for Windows Embedded Industry not Windows XP and while that should not matter, it is possible there may be some compatibility issues. Secondly – and most importantly – it is impossible to say whether these hacks will keep working until support ends for Windows Embedded Industry in 2019 or if Microsoft will close this loophole.

The optimistic viewpoint is Windows XP’s end of life status should mean it receives no future software updates so Microsoft would have to make another U-turn to close the loophole.

The cynical viewpoint is Microsoft would prefer users to move to a newer operating system so closing the loophole would be in its interest. This is a fair point given the age of Windows XP, but countered by the fact 1-in-4 PCs still use it. Microsoft also hasn’t helped its case after releasing misleading data earlier this month suggesting Windows XP is safer than Windows Vista and Windows 7.

Either way Microsoft is left in a tricky situation. Following the controversial ‘Update 1’ patch Windows 8.1 is actually a very good operating system, but its reputation is irreparably damaged.

Furthermore, while it is fair to stop providing a free warranty service for a 12 year old OS, Microsoft is offering military and government organisations a paid service to keep their Windows XP computers safe as part of a scheme dubbed ‘Clandestine Fox ’. Surely this should also be a paid option for users who wish to stay safe, but can’t afford new hardware or fear the leap to a free Linux alternative like Ubuntu.

Yes Windows XP has arguably been Microsoft’s greatest success, but its troubled legacy is fast becoming the company’s Achilles Heel .

Call 1-800-935-0537 For any support.

http://computertechsupport.us/

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Some Common Printer Problems

Problem: Printing is too slow.

Solution: Rev up printer performance–and save ink in the process–by reducing print quality for everyday output. While printer settings vary by model, here’s how to switch to draft-printing mode in most Windows apps. Select Print and Properties, and then look for a setting that reduces print quality. With the HP Photosmart 8450, for instance, change the default print quality setting from Normal to Fast Draft (click screen-shot at right). Other speedup suggestions: Print pages from websites without graphics, and add RAM to your printer, if possible. 

Problem: Ink and/or toner costs too much.

Solution: http://computertechsupport.us/ has written a lot about the printing industry’s sneaky practices over the years. To wit: They snare you with dirt-cheap printers sold at or below cost, and then stick it to you later with ultra-pricey consumables.

Based on our tests, we can’t recommend third party vendors’ remanufactured or refilled ink cartridges, which may not give you your money’s worth. One cost-saving solution is to buy higher-capacity cartridges. If you print a lot, try an ink cartridge with a 250-plus page yield, or a toner cartridge with a 2,000-plus page yield.

Problem: Windows is sending print jobs to the wrong printer.

Solution: For some mysterious reason, Windows may select a new default printer–the one it automatically sends print jobs to. (This happened to me when I upgraded from Vista to Windows 7.) To fix this glitch in Windows 7, click Start (the Windows icon in the lower-left corner of the screen) and select Devices and Printers. Under Printers and Faxes, right-click the printer you want to make the default, and select Set as default printer.

If you’re using earlier versions of Windows, these steps vary a bit.

A Single Call Can Resolve Your Problem

Call us at 1-800-935-0537

Call us at 1-800-935-0537

A Toll-Free number which can solve all your Computer related problem.

We have different teams for different products like Windows, Printers, Antiviruses, Quickbooks, Emails, and all other related services.

So just get in contact and leave your problem to us.

 

visit http://computertechsupport.us/